For the Covid economic recovery look to the Treasury, not the Bank | Business

For the Covid economic recovery look to the Treasury, not the Bank | Business

Both of the big jobs in UK economic management changed hands earlier this year. Within weeks of Rishi Sunak taking over from Sajid Javid at the Treasury, Andrew Bailey replaced Mark Carney at the Bank of England. Sunak has barely been out of the news in the months since, and he will remain centre stage

Both of the big jobs in UK economic management changed hands earlier this year. Within weeks of Rishi Sunak taking over from Sajid Javid at the Treasury, Andrew Bailey replaced Mark Carney at the Bank of England.

Sunak has barely been out of the news in the months since, and he will remain centre stage after the decision to put England back into lockdown. In the past few weeks alone, the chancellor has announced and recalibrated the job support scheme. Now he has been forced to reinstate the furlough, with the Treasury back to paying 80% of the wages of those unable to work.

Bailey, by contract, has had a much lower profile. The Bank moved quickly to cut interest rates and create money in the early stages of the crisis, and was part of the international action to ensure that financial markets did not freeze up completely.

Since then, however, the Bank has been like the solid cricket batsman holding up an end so that the stroke maker at the other end can notch up some runs. As the International Monetary Fund (IMF) made clear in its annual health check on the UK economy, the Bank and the Treasury work well together, but there is no doubt which has been the junior partner in recent months.

The new lockdown in England means there will be heightened interest this week when the Bank’s monetary policy committee (MPC) announces the results of its latest deliberations. If though, as expected, Threadneedle Street says it will expand its quantitative easing (QE) or money creation programme by £100bn, the impact on the economy will be modest.

Interest rates are already at their lowest in the Bank’s 326-year history at 0.1%, and the MPC is thinking about whether to follow the example of the European Central Bank (ECB) and take them negative. This looks unlikely, both because there are concerns about the impact of negative rates on the profitability of banks and because there is scant evidence in the eurozone – or in the other places where they have been tried – that they succeed in one of their principal aims: raising inflation rates.

Indeed, there is more than a hint of angels dancing on pinheads about the Bank’s negative interest rate debate. Put simply, what Sunak decides to do about furloughed workers makes a material difference to the economy. Whether official rates are pegged at 0.1% or -0.1% does not.

The contrast with the last crisis and its aftermath is stark. Then the Bank did most of the heavy lifting to support the economy. It cut interest rates from 5% to 0.5% and announced the first tranche of QE. The Conservative chancellor after the 2010 election, George Osborne, expected the Bank to provide the growth stimulus so that he could tackle the budget deficit with spending cuts and tax increases.

This division of responsibility was rooted in the widespread belief that short-term tweaks to the economy were best achieved through…

Read More: For the Covid economic recovery look to the Treasury, not the Bank | Business

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